Smart Home And Life

BC - MetaCognition

Hi, I’m Lee Hayden, physicist, website owner, manager, and author .  I am pleased to welcome you to the Hayden Center For Educational Excellence.  The Hayden Center  offers students a variety of educational programs of study, each  program leading to an opportunity to  experience a unique  form of  lifestyle  enrichment.  Click here to review the available programs of study, courses, durations, and costs.  Contact Lee Hayden at 707-945-1294 for additional information.


At the Hayden Center, the student selects a personal lifestyle enrichment program from the following:  self-actualization, personal true-self, or community true-self.  (Alternatively, the student may select an individual course such as this course.)  Programs are implemented as free brief courses and associated fee-based short courses.  The Hayden Center provides the educational environment that supports the student’s attainment of the selected lifestyle enrichment program or coursework.


This is a free brief course.  Similar  to all  brief courses,  it only introduces and   summarizes the key ideas  contained in the associated fee based short course.  Short courses are uniquely beneficial because they are conducted in a  face-to-face in person or on-line learning environment which assures the studied material becomes working knowledge.  As brief/short course author ,  I sincerely strive to produce courses whose content meets or exceeds common standards of excellence, objectivity, reliability, and life enrichment.  To enroll in the short course, phone Lee at 702-945-1294.














As discussed in other courses, the need to live an enriched lifestyle is deeply embedded in every human being.  The techniques and tools of metacognition are major factors  satisfying this need.  Depending on the extent of incorporation  into your lifestyle, metacognition  offers possibilities of  dramatically changing who you are!


Habitual use of the metacognition

Enlarges you scope of thinking
Deepens your understanding of reading material
Improves communication with other people
Helps you think more critically

And changes your life.


Critical thinking is intentional thought that is logical, rational, and open-minded. Metacognitive thinking is an application  of critical thinking and is defined to be thinking about thinking.  



Metacognition is defined as thinking about our own thinking.  It is somewhat similar to self-introspection during which we learn about our psychological selves; however, it is dissimilar to introspection because the focus is only on our thinking, i.e., on our thought process.


Having metacognition skills helps people to perform many cognitive tasks more effectively. Strategies for promoting metacognition include self-questioning (e.g. "What do I already know about this topic? How have I solved problems like this before?"), thinking aloud while performing a task, and making graphic representations (e.g. concept maps, flow charts, semantic webs) of one's thoughts and knowledge. Even the act of writing contributes to  the development of metacognitive skills.


Application of metacognition also involves thinking about one's own thinking process such as study skills, memory capabilities, and the ability to monitor learning. This concept needs to be explicitly taught along with content instruction. Metacognitive knowledge is about one's own cognitive processes and the understanding of how to regulate those processes to maximize learning.





Here is an example.  Let’s say that you and your friend are trying to decide what the greatest song ever written is.  This is quite the challenge, as it is fundamentally a subjective question.  However, you opt to think critically, whereas your friend doesn’t.  Your friend responds that “Friday” by Rebecca Black is the greatest song ever written.  


Using your critical thinking try to dissect the question.  What makes a song great?   This could be a number of factors: most awards, highest record sales, standing the test of time, influence over culture .,……Thus, you are thinking about the question as well as the answer.   You are thinking about thinking.  






Content knowledge (declarative knowledge) which is understanding one's own capabilities such as a student evaluating his/her own knowledge of a subject in a class. It is notable that not all metacognition is accurate. Studies have shown that students often mistake lack of effort with understanding in evaluating themselves and their overall knowledge of a concept. Also, more confidence in having performed well, goes along with less accurate metacognitive judgment of the performance.


Task knowledge (procedural knowledge) which is how one perceives the difficulty of a task which is the content, length, and the type of assignment. The study mentioned in Content knowledge also deals with the ability of one to evaluate the difficulty of the task related to their overall performance on the task. Again, the accuracy of this knowledge was skewed as students who thought their way was better/easier also seemed to perform worse on evaluations, while students who were rigorously and continually evaluated reported to not be as confident but still did better on initial evaluations.


Strategic knowledge (conditional knowledge) which is one's own capability for using strategies to learn information. Young children are not particularly good at this; it is not until students are in upper elementary school that they begin to develop an understanding of effective strategies.










Metacognition is a general term encompassing the study of memory-monitoring and self-regulation, meta-reasoning, consciousness/awareness and auto-consciousness/self-awareness. In practice these capacities are used to regulate one's own cognition, to maximize one's potential to think, learn and to the evaluation of proper ethical/moral rules. It can also lead to the reduction in response time for a given situation due to heightened awareness and potentially reduce cycle times to complete problems or tasks.


Components

Metacognition is classified into three components:


Metacognitive knowledge (also called metacognitive awareness) is what individuals know about themselves and others as cognitive processors.


Metacognitive regulation is the regulation of cognition and learning experiences through a set of activities that help people control their learning.


Metacognitive experiences are those experiences that have something to do with the current, on-going cognitive endeavor.


Metacognition refers to a level of thinking that involves active control over the process of thinking that is used in learning situations. Planning the way to approach a learning task, monitoring comprehension, and evaluating the progress towards the completion of a task: these are skills that are metacognitive in their nature.


Metacognition includes at least three different types of metacognitive awareness when considering metacognitive knowledge:


Declarative knowledge: refers to knowledge about oneself as a learner and about what factors can influence one's performance. Declarative knowledge can also be referred to as "world knowledge".


Procedural knowledge: refers to knowledge about doing things. This type of knowledge is displayed as heuristics and strategies.  A high degree of procedural knowledge can allow individuals to perform tasks more automatically. This is achieved through a large variety of strategies that can be accessed more efficiently.


Conditional knowledge: refers to knowing when and why to use declarative and procedural knowledge. It allows students to allocate their resources when using strategies. This in turn allows the strategies to become more effective.


Similar to metacognitive knowledge, metacognitive regulation or "regulation of cognition" contains three skills that are essential.


Planning: refers to the appropriate selection of strategies and the correct allocation of resources that affect task performance.

Monitoring: refers to one's awareness of comprehension and task performance

Evaluating: refers to appraising the final product of a task and the efficiency at which the task was performed. This can include re-evaluating strategies that were used.

Similarly, maintaining motivation to see a task to completion is also a metacognitive skill. The ability to become aware of distracting stimuli – both internal and external – and sustain effort over time also involves metacognitive or executive functions. The theory that metacognition has a critical role to play in successful learning means it is important that it be demonstrated by both students and teachers.


Students who demonstrate a wide range of metacognitive skills perform better on exams and complete work more efficiently. They are self-regulated learners who utilize the "right tool for the job" and modify learning strategies and skills based on their awareness of effectiveness. Individuals with a high level of metacognitive knowledge and skill identify blocks to learning as early as possible and change "tools" or strategies to ensure goal attainment. Swanson (1990) found that metacognitive knowledge can compensate for IQ and lack of prior knowledge when comparing fifth and sixth grade students' problem solving. Students with a high-metacognition were reported to have used fewer strategies, but solved problems more effectively than low-metacognition students, regardless of IQ or prior knowledge. In one study examining students who do text messaging during college lectures, it was suggested that students with higher metacognitive abilities were less likely than other students to have their learning impacted by using a mobile phone in class.


The fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.


— Bertrand Russell

Metacognologists are aware of their own strengths and weaknesses, the nature of the task at hand, and available "tools" or skills. A broader repertoire of "tools" also assists in goal attainment. When "tools" are general, generic, and context independent, they are more likely to be useful in different types of learning situations.


Another distinction in metacognition is executive management and strategic knowledge. Executive management processes involve planning, monitoring, evaluating and revising one's own thinking processes and products. Strategic knowledge involves knowing what (factual or declarative knowledge), knowing when and why (conditional or contextual knowledge) and knowing how (procedural or methodological knowledge). Both executive management and strategic knowledge metacognition are needed to self-regulate one's own thinking and learning.[20]


Finally, there is no distinction between domain-general and domain-specific metacognitive skills. This means that metacognitive skills are domain-general in nature and there are no specific skills for certain subject areas. The metacognitive skills that are used to review an essay are the same as those that are used to verify an answer to a math question.

Metacognitive experience is responsible for creating an identity that matters to an individual. The creation of the identity with metacognitive experience is linked to the identity-based motivation (IBM) model. The identity-based motivation model implies that "identities matter because they provide a basis for meaning making and for action." A person decides also if the identity matters in two ways with metacognitive experience. First, a current or possible identity is either "part of the self and so worth pursuing"[23] or the individual thinks that the identity is part of their self, yet it is conflicting with more important identities and the individual will decide if the identity is or is not worth pursuing. Second, it also helps an individual decide if an identity should be pursued or abandoned.


Usually, abandoning identity has been linked to metacognitive difficulty. Based on the identity-based motivation model there are naive theories describing difficulty as a way to continue to pursue an identity. The incremental theory of ability states that if "effort matters then difficulty is likely to be interpreted as meaning that more effort is needed." Here is an example: a woman who loves to play clarinet has come upon a hard piece of music. She knows that how much effort she puts into learning this piece is beneficial. The piece had difficulty so she knew the effort was needed. The identity the woman wants to pursue is to be a good clarinet player; having a metacognitive experience difficulty pushed her to learn the difficult piece to continue to identify with her identity. The entity theory of ability represents the opposite. This theory states that if "effort does not matter then difficulty is likely to be interpreted as meaning that ability is lacking so effort should be suspended." Based on the example of the woman playing the clarinet, if she did not want to identify herself as a good clarinet player, she would not have put in any effort to learn the difficult piece which is an example of using metacognitive experience difficulty to abandon an identity.


Strategies[edit]

Metacognitive-like processes are especially ubiquitous when it comes to the discussion of self-regulated learning. Being engaged in metacognition is a salient feature of good self-regulated learners. Reinforcing collective discussion of metacognition is a salient feature of self-critical and self-regulating social groups.[citation needed] The activities of strategy selection and application include those concerned with an ongoing attempt to plan, check, monitor, select, revise, evaluate, etc.


Metacognition is 'stable' in that learners' initial decisions derive from the pertinent facts about their cognition through years of learning experience. Simultaneously, it is also 'situated' in the sense that it depends on learners' familiarity with the task, motivation, emotion, and so forth. Individuals need to regulate their thoughts about the strategy they are using and adjust it based on the situation to which the strategy is being applied. At a professional level, this has led to emphasis on the development of reflective practice, particularly in the education and health-care professions.



Metacognitive strategies training can consist of coaching the students in thinking skills that will allow them to monitor their own learning. Examples of strategies that can be taught to students are word analysis skills, active reading strategies, listening skills, organizational skills and creating mnemonic devices.

Walker and Walker have developed a model of metacognition in school learning termed Steering Cognition. Steering Cognition describes the capacity of the mind to exert conscious control over its reasoning and processing strategies in relation to the external learning task. Studies have shown that pupils with an ability to exert metacognitive regulation over their attentional and reasoning strategies used when engaged in maths, and then shift those strategies when engaged in science or then English literature learning, associate with higher academic outcomes at secondary school.


Metastrategic knowledge[edit]

"Metastrategic knowledge" (MSK) is a sub-component of metacognition that is defined as general knowledge about higher order thinking strategies. MSK had been defined as "general knowledge about the cognitive procedures that are being manipulated". The knowledge involved in MSK consists of "making generalizations and drawing rules regarding a thinking strategy" and of "naming" the thinking strategy.[38]


The important conscious act of a metastrategic strategy is the "conscious" awareness that one is performing a form of higher order thinking. MSK is an awareness of the type of thinking strategies being used in specific instances and it consists of the following abilities: making generalizations and drawing rules regarding a thinking strategy, naming the thinking strategy, explaining when, why and how such a thinking strategy should be used, when it should not be used, what are the disadvantages of not using appropriate strategies, and what task characteristics call for the use of the strategy.


MSK deals with the broader picture of the conceptual problem. It creates rules to describe and understand the physical world around the people who utilize these processes called higher-order thinking. This is the capability of the individual to take apart complex problems in order to understand the components in problem. These are the building blocks to understanding the "big picture" (of the main problem) through reflection and problem solving.

Characteristics of theory of mind: Understanding the mind and the "mental world":


False beliefs: understanding that a belief is only one of many and can be false.

Appearance–reality distinctions: something may look one way but may be something else.

Visual perspective taking: the views of physical objects differ based on perspective.

Introspection: children's awareness and understanding of their own thoughts.

Action[edit]

Both social and cognitive dimensions of sporting expertise can be adequately explained from a metacognitive perspective according to recent research. The potential of metacognitive inferences and domain-general skills including psychological skills training are integral to the genesis of expert performance. Moreover, the contribution of both mental imagery (e.g., mental practice) and attentional strategies (e.g., routines) to our understanding of expertise and metacognition is noteworthy. The potential of metacognition to illuminate our understanding of action was first highlighted by Aidan Moran who discussed the role of meta-attention in 1996. A recent research initiative, a research seminar series called META funded by the BPS, is exploring the role of the related constructs of meta-motivation, meta-emotion, and thinking and action (metacognition).


Mental illness[edit]

Sparks of interest[edit]

In the context of mental health, metacognition can be loosely defined as the process that "reinforces one's subjective sense of being a self and allows for becoming aware that some of one's thoughts and feelings are symptoms of an illness".[43] The interest in metacognition emerged from a concern for an individual's ability to understand their own mental status compared to others as well as the ability to cope with the source of their distress.[44] These insights into an individual's mental health status can have a profound effect on the over-all prognosis and recovery. Metacognition brings many unique insights into the normal daily functioning of a human being. It also demonstrates that a lack of these insights compromises 'normal' functioning. This leads to less healthy functioning. In the Autism spectrum, there is a profound inability to feel empathy towards the minds of other human beings.[45] In people who identify as alcoholics, there is a belief that the need to control cognitions is an independent predictor of alcohol use over anxiety. Alcohol may be used as a coping strategy for controlling unwanted thoughts and emotions formed by negative perceptions. This is sometimes referred to as self medication.


Implications[edit]

Well's and Matthew's theory proposes that when faced with an undesired choice, an individual can operate in two distinct modes: "object" and "metacognitive". Object mode interprets perceived stimuli as truth, where metacognitive mode understands thoughts as cues that have to be weighted and evaluated. They are not as easily trusted. There are targeted interventions unique of each patient, that gives rise to the belief that assistance in increasing metacognition in people diagnosed with schizophrenia is possible through tailored psychotherapy. With a customized therapy in place clients then have the potential to develop greater ability to engage in complex self-reflection.[48] This can ultimately be pivotal in the patient's recovery process. In the obsessive–compulsive spectrum, cognitive formulations have greater attention to intrusive thoughts related to the disorder. "Cognitive self-consciousness" are the tendencies to focus attention on thought. Patients with OCD exemplify varying degrees of these "intrusive thoughts". Patients also suffering from generalized anxiety disorder also show negative thought process in their cognition.[49]


Cognitive-attentional syndrome (CAS) characterizes a metacognitive model of emotion disorder (CAS is consistent with the attention strategy of excessively focusing on the source of a threat). This ultimately develops through the client's own beliefs. Metacognitive therapy attempts to correct this change in the CAS. One of the techniques in this model is called attention training (ATT).[50] It was designed to diminish the worry and anxiety by a sense of control and cognitive awareness. ATT also trains clients to detect threats and test how controllable reality appears to be.[51]


Works of art as metacognitive artifacts

The concept of metacognition has also been applied to reader-response criticism. Narrative works of art, including novels, movies and musical compositions, can be characterized as metacognitive artifacts which are designed by the artist to anticipate and regulate the beliefs and cognitive processes of the recipient, for instance, how and in which order events and their causes and identities are revealed to the reader of a detective story. As Menakhem Perry has pointed out, mere order has profound effects on the aesthetical meaning of a text.[53] Narrative works of art contain a representation of their own ideal reception process. They are something of a tool with which the creators of the work wish to attain certain aesthetical and even moral effects.


Mind wandering[edit]

There is an intimate, dynamic interplay between mind wandering and metacognition. Metacognition serves to correct the wandering mind, suppressing spontaneous thoughts and bringing attention back to more "worthwhile" tasks.[55][56]

Metacognition has continued to be an intense area of  research by educators and psychologists since the middle of the 1970’s. Researchers have used various other defintions including the following:  higher-level cognition, cognition about cognition,  thinking about thinking. self-awareness, self-monitoring, self-representation, and self-regulation. Each of these areas, along with processing efficiency and reasoning,  have traditionally been considered to compose our personality and intelligence.


Organizational metacognition[edit]

The concept of metacognition has also been applied to collective teams and organizations in general, termed organizational metacognition.


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Short Course Cost

Title:  Metacognition

Session Length

Cost

Unit Cost

Basic 1 Hour Session

$50

$50/Hour

Basic Plus One Extension,
Two 1 Hour Sessions

$90

$45/Hour