Smart Home And Life

BC - Building Your Memory

Table 2.  Major Memory System.


s, z, soft c

z is the first letter of zero.  The others have a similar sound.

1

d, t, th

d and t have one downstroke and sound similar

2

n

n has two downstrokes

3

m

m has three downstrokes

4

r

The last letter of four.  Also,  4 and R are almost mirror images of each other

5

l

L is the Roman numeral for 50

6

j, sh, soft ch, dg,zh, soft g

a script j has a lower loop like 6.  These letters also have a "whistle-like" sound, and 6 looks like a whistle

7

k, hard c, hard g,q, qu

Capital K contains two 7's (on their sides, back to back)

8

v, f

Think of v as in a V8motor.  f sounds similar (notice how your teeth touch your lips for both.)

9

b, p

p is a mirror-image 9.  b sounds similar and resembles a 9 rolled around (Also notice how your lip movement is the same when pronouncing these letters.)

- - -

Vowel sounds, w, h, and y

These sounds can be used anywhere without changing a word's number value.

BC - Building Memory

Table 1. Personal Home Peg List











1

Car

11

Big Chair

21

Father

31

Tub

41

Dog

2

Driveway

12

Sofa

22

Mother

32

Toilet

42

Fence

3

Garage

13

Bookcase

23

Brother

33

Mirror

43

Fig Tree

4

Curb

14

Blond Table

24

Me

34

Faucet

44

Hose

5

Lawn

15

Telephone

25

Kitchen Table

35

Enema

45

Hutch

6

Sidewalk

16

Carpet

26

Chair

36

Bed

46

Racoon

7

Tree

17

Clock

27

Window Sill

37

Closet

47

Fish Tank

8

Portch

18

Whiskey

28

Kitchen Sink

38

Radio

48

Tools

9

Plant

19

Ivy Plant

29

Stove

39

Desk

49

Mouse

10

Door

20

TV

30

Refrigerator

40

Light

50

Garden

Hi, I’m Lee Hayden,  website owner, manager, and author .  Welcome to the Hayden Center For Educational Excellence.  The Hayden Center  offers students a variety of educational programs of study, each  program leading to an opportunity to  experience a unique  form of  lifestyle  enrichment.  Click here to review the available programs of study, courses, durations, and costs.  Contact Lee Hayden at 707-945-1294 if you have questions.


Want to build  your memory?

An excellent memory greatly enhances achievement of your lifestyle objectives.


The possession of memory is an essential feature of our being human.  But, less obvously true is the statement  that possession of an excellent memory is essential  to  becoming the person you want to be , i.e.,  self-actualized  or true-self.  An excellent memory is also essential in both successful performance of  Hayden Center studies and  becoming successful in almost all professional and personal endeavors during a person’s lifetime.  Also, it  must be noted that  an excellent memory is a major factor in building  high self-esteem.  Development of an excellent memory will pay handsome dividends throughout  your lifespan.


The  purpose of this brief course is to introduce  and summarize the subject  “Building Your Memory” in sufficient detail so that the student may determine if the short course meets their specific needs.  The discussion  includes two well-known memory methods that are known  to be exceptionally effective by many researchers. This is a free brief course and is intended  for students  who 1) recognize the key role of an excellent memory in accomplishing almost all daily lifestyle activities and objectives  and 2) choose to work independently in building their memory.   


The short course is advantageous because it 1) presents more details, including how we form memories and a simple three stage model, 2) provides practice of the memory building methods, 3)  is conducted  face-to-face in person or online, and 4) provides a high level of confidence that the desired excellent memory will be acquired.  To enroll in the short course, phone Lee at 702-945-1294.


 I’m Lee Hayden and I commit  to making this a course of high quality and exceptionally beneficial to you.






The two best-known memory methods are Loci Memory Method and the Major Memory Method.  Both systems are considered in many modern psychology texts.The Loci method, also called the Palace Memory Method, has a peg list, i.e., a  reference list of familiar places and is used to encode nouns.  Nouns are persons, places, or things. The Major method is used to encode numbers.


The literature suggests using the familiarity with your childhood home as the basis of your  peg list.  I continue to recall the peg list I created  as an early teenager based on my home during those years.  You may choose to use my list, but creating your own personal list would be a great idea and probably more effective.  My list begins with observations of objects in my front yard, continues with observations of objects in living room, kitchen, bathroom, my bedroom,  and concludes with observations of objects in my back yard.  


You will be surprised how quickly you can create your personalized peg list. Start slowly with just 10 objects on your peg list. Then, expand to 20 followed by expansions to 50 and 100.  My original  “Personal Home Peg List” contained 50 objects as shown in Table 1 but I later expanded it to 100 objects.  















If my Mom asked me to pick up a can of coffee, a loaf of bread, a carton of cokes,  bananas, and a package of butter, then I would create a mental pictures of  can of coffee in my car (peg location #1) , a loaf of bread on my driveway (peg location #2), a carton of cokes in my garage (peg location #3), bananas on the curb (peg location #4) , and a package of butter on the lawn (peg location #5)


The Major memory system, presented in Table  2,  is one of the most powerful techniques around for memorizing numbers.  It is a great system, but it must be memorized prior to usage.







  


















The brain is famous for its inability to remember numbers.  Numbers are abstract concepts whereas our brains have evolved such they are best at recognizing and storing images.  Thus, the Major memory system provides an encoding part of a system in which numbers are first  encoded into sounds, then into words, and ultimately into vivid pictures.


For example, consider the two digits in the number 42.  According to Table 2,  the 4 and the 2 translate to r and n, respectively. Now we must find a word containing r and n.  We can fill gaps in the word with vowel sounds as indicated in Table 2.  The first word that might come to mind is “rain” and we now encode the number 42 as rain.


If we wanted to put the number 42 in peg location #1, then we would create a mental picture of rain falling on our car. Or, to place 42 in peg location #21, we would create a mental picture of rain falling on father.














The short course will address the following topics:


  1. Like perception, memory is an interpretation of experience
  2. Memories are generally not accurate
  3. Our brain’s neural network is not yet formed during adolescence, leading  to unusal behaviors, excessive risk taking, and impulsivity.
BC - Building Memory